Vermicomposting

, ,

Compost worms will eat your food scraps, and turn them into vermicompost, one of the richest soil amendments. Worms are also ideal in New England and can be stored inside, even in a kitchen below the sink, to make compost year-round or in homes with no yards.
Steps:
(1) A plastic container, sized based on what would fit under your sink, or in your pantry, or wherever you want to store this indoor composter. Starting about four inches up the side, add holes with a drill in the sides and top (air circulation is key to good compost, and no smell!).
(2) Biodegradable bedding material (think browns – newspapers, leaves, shredded top secret documents).
(3) Uncooked (or oiled or sugared) fruit and vegetable waste (greens), and coffee grounds.
(4) Worms! Try to buy them locally, from Cape Cod Worm Farm in Buzzards Bay.
For more information about indoor composting, review the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection Webpage on Vermicomposting.

-Lauren Greenhow, General Manager, GreenHow, Inc.
http://www.greenhow.com/
. Effective Organic & Low Impact Solutions, Lawn Care, Pest Control & Termite Control in Newton and Metro Boston.

As leaves start to fall, consider composting them

, ,

In small urban lots, it can be difficult, but try to compost as many leaves as possible. Two primary ways to compost is either pile composting at a composter or for leaves on the lawn area, mow the leaves every few days to keep up with them and mulch the leaves into the lawn. This mowing, combined with fall fertilization will have the benefits of adding organic matter to your lawn. Michigan State has great information on mulching leaves, available online here.
-Lauren Greenhow, General Manager, GreenHow, Inc.
www.GreenHow.com. Effective Organic & Low Impact Solutions, Lawn Care, Pest Control & Termite Control in Newton and Metro Boston.

Think about composting, It’s spring.

, ,

Use the return of warm weather as a chance to open your composter and begin to use it again. Remember to add paper towels or other “browns” to augment the green material you are putting in. And use a hose to wet it down, it should be as moist as a wrung out sponge.
-Lauren Greenhow, General Manager, GreenHow, Inc.
www.GreenHow.com. Effective Organic & Low Impact Solutions, Lawn Care, Pest Control & Termite Control in Newton and Metro Boston.