Winter Moth is Active

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Adult Winter Moth

Early this morning winter moth males were seen flying around lights in metro Boston in Belmont, Watertown and Newton.  This moth will mate and the female who cannot fly will lay her eggs in the cracks of bark on trees.  Those eggs will hatch in the spring and the larva will climb up into the buds and feed on the leaf tissue as spring progresses.  Look for winter moth males to be flying around lights at home, street lights, car and truck lights over the next few weeks.  Activity is highest after precipitation.  No control measures are needed now and these winter moths will not infest a structure or feed on grain or clothing.

-Lauren Greenhow, General Manager, GreenHow, Inc. GreenHow.com. Effective Organic and Low Impact Solutions, Lawn Care, Pest Control and Termite Control in Newton and Metro Boston.

Winter Moth, Annual appearance, on milder late fall days.

Winter moth adults will appear in large numbers around lights over the next few weeks.  Many areas have already seen winter moth adults.  These adults mate and the females lay eggs in the barks of trees they will attack.  The eggs hatch in early spring, with the larva climbing up into the canopy to consume the leaf tissue of the infested tree.  Work is underway in Massachusetts to implement some biological control measures.

The University of Massachusetts Cooperative Extension is looking for reports of Winter Moth, so please report activity if you see winter moth this fall at this link to the Massachusetts Winter Moth Survey.

-Lauren Greenhow, General Manager, GreenHow, Inc.
GreenHow.com. Effective Organic and Low Impact Solutions, Lawn Care, Pest Control and Termite Control in Newton and Metro Boston.

Winter Moth-Active Last Night

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Winter Moth

 The moth surrounding your outside lights last night was the winter moth.  They have been active over the past few weeks and will continue to be active.  These adults are emerging from pupae casings in the soil.  The winter moth male and female will mate on a tree trunk, where the female will lay her eggs on the bark.  To protect landscape plants, including trees and shrubs, a variety of options exist, from late winter and early spring horticultural oil sprays to suffocate the eggs, to injection of a tree to kill the feeding larva, to spraying the foliage to kill the feeding larva.  For more winter moth information, contact us, or check out the Winter Moth web page at UMass.

Lauren Greenhow, General Manager, GreenHow, Inc.

www.GreenHow.com. Effective Organic & Low Impact Solutions, Lawn Care, Pest Control & Termite Control in Newton and Metro Boston.

Winter Moth, Again?

The time has just ended for a round of winter moths flying around exterior lights in Eastern Massachusetts. There is no need for fall treatment sprays, the best idea is to either inject the trees in the fall or early spring with a two year control material, or wait until the leaf has unfurled and treat the foliage with a foliar spray. Fall sprayings have very limited benefit. The numbers of Cyzenis albicans, a Tachinid fly that parasitizes only winter moth, have been rising since they have been introduced and will continue to provide a natural predatory control.
-Lauren Greenhow, General Manager, GreenHow, Inc.
www.GreenHow.com. Effective Organic & Low Impact Solutions, Lawn Care, Pest Control & Termite Control in Newton and Metro Boston.

-Lauren Greenhow, General Manager, GreenHow, Inc.
GreenHow.com. Effective Organic & Low Impact Solutions, Lawn Care, Pest Control & Termite Control in Newton and Metro Boston.

Think about winter moth now

If you had winter moth damage last year, or noticed large numbers of the male winter moths around your lights this past winter, think about protecting your favorite decidous trees now. To be most effective, treatment must be done as early in spring as possible. This is because the early stage winter moth caterpillar will bore into the foliar buds PRIOR to the trees leafing out, consuming young leaves or leaving them damaged as they unfurl.
-Lauren Greenhow, General Manager, GreenHow, Inc.
www.GreenHow.com. Effective Organic & Low Impact Solutions, Lawn Care, Pest Control & Termite Control in Newton and Metro Boston.

Winter Moth’s are out now.

You may have noticed either driving home at night, or outside your home or business in the lights, a number of brown moths. These adult winter moths you see will mate, then lay eggs in the bark of host trees such as maples, oak, apple, crabapple, ash, fringetree and blueberry. In the spring, these eggs will hatch and the larval stage will climb to the branches and feed on the leaves, dropping to the ground in late spring to continue the life cycle through the summer in the soil, where they will pupate to emerge as adult moths next November and December. Treatment strategies include early spring horticultural oil on the trunks of host plants to suffocate the eggs, and/or a systemic treatment, such as the Tree Injection Service we provide, to protect susceptible trees. The University of Massachusetts has a great information sheet on winter moth, click here to link to it.
-Lauren Greenhow, General Manager, GreenHow, Inc.

www.GreenHow.com. Effective Organic & Low Impact Solutions, Lawn Care, Pest Control & Termite Control in Newton and Metro Boston.